Conservative Christians want more religion in public life. Texas lawmakers are listening.

A new legal and political landscape


Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick calls attention to a man holding a sign reading “Jesus is king,” and praises him for putting his faith first, while delivering his inaugural address after taking the oath of office at the state Capitol in Austin on Jan. 17, 2023.

Credit:
Evan L’Roy/The Texas Tribune

Founding fathers: A wall of separation


First: State Rep. Mayes Middleton, R-Galveston, shown speaking to state rep. Briscoe Cain, R-Deer Park, on the House floor on August 9, 2021, has said church-state separation is not a real doctrine. Last: State Rep. Phil King R-Weatherford, shown on the House floor on May 25, 2019, has filed a bill that would require the Ten Commandments to be posted in public school classrooms.

Credit:
Jordan Vonderhaar and Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune

A “massive shift” in the law?

Rulings embraced by school choice advocates